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Science Journal

 

The Journal of American Science

(J Am Sci)

ISSN 1545-1003

Volume 10, Special Issue 9 (Supplement Issue 9), September 25, 2014

Cover Page, Introduction, Contents, Call for Papers, am1009s

 

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CONTENTS   

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Application of infrared thermal imagery for monitoring salt tolerant of wheat genotypes

 

Tarek Youssef Bayoumi 1, 2, Salah El-Hendawy2, Mohamed Sabry Hamada Yousef2, Mohamed Abed El Gawad Emam2; Salah Ahmed Abed El Gawad Okasha2

 

2Agronomy Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Suez Canal University, 41522 Ismailia, Egypt

dr.tarekbayoumi@yahoo.com

 

Abstract: Salinity is an international problem causing soil degradation and desertification; thereby threaten sustainable crop production in agriculture. Traditional methods of measuring wheat growth have been time-consuming and have often involved in the destructive harvest of plants. Thermal infrared imaging (IR) is now an established technology for the study of stomatal responses and for phenotyping the stomatal behavior under various environmental stresses. Two Experiments were carried out at the experimental farm of El Quantara Shark, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt to test whether thermal imaging can be used to distinguish between tolerant and sensitive wheat genotypes. Ten bread wheat genotypes differing in salt tolerance were evaluated under two soil salinity levels (EC =3.78 dS m-1and EC= 8.24 dSm-1). The salinity stress created a wide range in leaf temperature, stomatal conductance (IG) and Crop Water Stress Index (CWSI) between tested genotypes. Proline content increased by 13 fold in landraces 1, 2, 3and 10 folds in genotypes Sakha 8 and Kharchia due to salinity stress. There were inverse correlation between canopy temperature and CWSI (r= -0.31) and IG (r = 0.53). Thermal imaging can distinguish between salinity stress and non-stress canopies. Therefore, the application of these technologies and methodologies for efficient salinity managements in wheat open new opportunities and challenges in future precision farming.

[Tarek Youssef Bayoumi; Salah El-Hendawy, Mohamed Sabry Hamada Yousef, Mohamed Abed El Gawad Emam; Salah Ahmed Abed El Gawad Okasha. Application of infrared thermal imagery for monitoring salt tolerant of wheat genotypes. J Am Sci 2014;10(9s):1-8]. (ISSN: 1545-1003). http://www.jofamericanscience.org. 1

doi:10.7537/marsjas1009s14.01

 

Keywords: Crop Water Stress Index, leaf temperature, stomatal conductance.

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Sex estimation from measurements of the 12th thoracic vertebra using Multidetector Computed Tomography in Egyptian population

 

Morid M. Hanna1, Hala M. Ahmed1, GamalM.  aboul Hassan2,  Mostafa  M. Elian3, Eman R. Ghazawy4 and Rehab  H. Abd Elkarem1

 

1 Department of Forensic Medicine and Clinical Toxicology, Minia Faculty of Medicine, Egypt.

2Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, AI-Azhar University (Assuit), Egypt.

3Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Minia Faculty of Medicine, Egypt.

4Department of Public Health, Minia Faculty of Medicine, Egypt.

Gamalh87@yahoo.com

 

Abstract: Objective: The purpose of this study is to determine the presence/degree of sexual dimorphism of the 12th thoracic vertebra through a quantitative analysis and to further examine its potential and reliability in the sex estimation of human skeletal remains. Method: In order to assess this, the 12th thoracic vertebrae, 100 persons 51 males (age range 23-70 years) and 49 females (age range 17-62 years) from Egypt. These persons were patients who needed to undergo CT of the abdomen for several reasons in the Radiology Departments of Minia University hospital. CT studies were performed using a 16-detector Multi-Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) scanner .The morphology of the 12th thoracic vertebra was examined by nine measurements. Descriptive statistics, including means, standard deviation and test of significance were performed for each of the measurements. To assess the level of significance in the mean values between the sexes, t-test was applied and a value of P < 0.05 was considered significant. Univariate and stepwise discriminant function analysis were carried out respectively. Results: The coronal diameter of vertebral body (BDc) and vertebral length (VL) are found to be highly significant sexually dimorphic. The sagittal diameter of vertebral body (BDs) and length of spinous process (SL) showed high significant sexual dimorphism. While the height of pedicle on right and left side (PHr & PHI) are significantly sexually dimorphic. The highest accuracy was obtained with the BDc (87%). Conclusion: The result of the present work showed that the lih thoracic vertebra exhibits anatomic variability between genders. 12th thoracic vertebra dimensions measurements, especially the coronal diameter of vertebral body, are valuable in studying sexual dimorphism.

[Morid M. Hanna, Hala M. Ahmed, GamalM. aboul Hassan, Mostafa M. Elian, Eman R. Ghazawy and Rehab H. Abd Elkarem. Sex estimation from measurements of the 12th thoracic vertebra using Multidetector Computed Tomography in Egyptian population. J Am Sci 2014;10(9s):9-14]. (ISSN: 1545-1003). http://www.jofamericanscience.org. 2

doi:10.7537/marsjas1009s14.02

 

Key words: MDCT, sex estimation, lih thoracic vertebra, discriminant function analysis.

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 The manuscripts in this issue are presented as online first for peer-review, starting from September 15, 2014. 
 
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doi:

doi:10.7537/marsjas1009s14.01

doi:10.7537/marsjas1009s14.02

 

 

doi:

doi:10.7537/marsjas1009s14.01

doi:10.7537/marsjas1009s14.02

 

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